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Joe

The only way to the Father is through the Son.

 

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21 Comments

  1. Bryan Whittlesey

    Joe:
    Concerning laminate flooring first row. I am installing this in a room with antique barn siding and hand hewn beams on concrete. These beams (four) protrude out from the wall 6 to 6 1/2 inches and my flooring measures 7 1/2 inches wide (12mm thick). Will I run into problems having only about one inch remaining after the cut-out? I could use an undercut saw on three sides of the beams to make the installation much neater and gain some material, maybe 1/2-3/4 inches. The width works out almost perfectly for the room without having to rip the first row. Thank you. Great information for us first timers, especially using screws for the first row holding the floor.
    Bryan

    Reply
    • Joe Letendre

      There won’t be a problem with that. I would undercut it though to get a nicer look.

      Reply
  2. Paul Lipartiti

    Hi Joe my grout joints were 3/16″. And my apologies for what seems like I vented on you.

    Reply
  3. Paul Lipartiti

    Hello Joe,

    I have been following your instructions and just completed my first bathroom installation. However I was doing the work for a friend (Pastor)) who has been renovating our church with no time for extras. I was given material and instructions by him and followed through on the job. End result looked good to me. Unfortunately he said today I used un-sanded grout on the walls and I should have used sanded grout. The un-sanded grout was for the ceiling now he has to remove the grout on the walls and replace it. I felt horrible and apologized, but he declined my offer of help. (I guess I really ticked him off) My question is does the grout have to be replaced?

    Reply
    • Joe Letendre

      Paul,
      How is your grout joints? The size of the joint is what determInes if I use sanded or unsanded

      Reply
  4. Bob Harwood

    Using my username and password, I can no longer get into my platinum account. I was hoping to review the section on tiling a shower curb. Can this please be corrected?

    Reply
    • Joe Letendre

      Bob,

      You need to access this through Tile University.

      Reply
      • jake

        I cant log in anymore either. I just signed up a few days ago and now it says “There is no user registered with that email address.” when I went to reset my password.

        Reply
  5. John

    Hi Joe. You’re site has been very helpful, so thanks.

    I am going to lay concrete tile over an existing ceramic tile floor in a 6’x6′ bathroom. I wanted to get your thoughts on the best way to do it. There are some high spots and low spots in the current floor. The high spots/uneven spots are usually where the four corners of tile meet. I have an angle grinder, so I was going to grind those down with a diamond-tip grinder and then fill in the low spots with thinset as you did in your tutorial.

    What other things do I need to consider in terms of preparing the old tile floor before getting started laying the new tile on top?

    Thanks!

    Reply
    • Joe Letendre

      As long as the existing tile is holding strong everything should be fine.. A good way to test this is tapping the tile with a screw driver to see if any have a hallow sound. Just hold it like a drum sick and tap the tile and if it is hallow you will know. another tell tale is if the grout joints are cracking and the grout is falling out.

      Reply
  6. Karl

    Joe,
    I completed half my project and realized I had some tiles sideways. What’s the best way to correct the problem without losing so many tiles?

    Reply
    • Joe Letendre

      What do you mean when you say sideways? How long ago did you install the tile??

      Reply
      • Karl

        The patterns do not match up. When I first looked at the tile I didn’t see an arrow on the back, nor did I notice there was a difference until the third day when I was laying them. So basically all the tile is not facing the same way. The patterns are geometric shapes that do not exactly match up because of this. It was laid starting 6 days ago.

        Reply
  7. Kerri

    Hello Joe,
    I am installing 1/2 cement board over 3/4 inch plywood for ceramic tile this is a completely new floor so there are no worries about the floors not being even. But my question is for the length of the screws we need to use. Should the screw go completely through the wood out the other side? I’m asking because this is in a trailer and the wood sub-floor is some what open to the elements.
    Thank you for your help.

    Reply
    • Joe Letendre

      I would use 1 1/4. It shouldn’t go through all the way. You could use an inch if your worried about , no big deal. It will hold just as good.

      Reply
      • Kerri

        Thank you for the help.

        Reply
        • Kerri

          Another question about installing the cement board. The type of plywood we have is very smooth and the mortar will not stick to the plywood. My question is can we use felt paper if so what type and what thickness? Also if we use the felt paper will we still have to use mortar?

          Reply
          • Joe Letendre

            Thin set should be used. It will stick to the floor.

  8. Barbara Reynolds

    I am installing a porcelain tile floor in a bathroom and need to know how to install the toilet flange. Do I want to install it on the tile — if so, can I drill the holes through the the tile? Or do I want to install the flange on the backer board and cut my tile to go around the flange? Would really appreciate some advice.

    Reply
    • Joe Letendre

      Barb,
      Install it on top of the cement board. This will take away any height issues. You can add spacers to it also. They look just like the flange minus the connecting pipe. I think they are about $5.

      Reply

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